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Malasada (Malassada)

Malasadas (Malassadas)
Malasadas (Malassadas) pictures (3 of 6)

When it comes to sweet decadent snacks on the island of Oahu, you simply can’t afford to miss out these sinfully sugary and to-die-for malasada, or malassada (the correct spelling)–a confection of Portuguese origin.

We were lucky. Had I not received two emails and a comment from my loyal reader Burt, we would have completely missed out one of the most delightful sweet treats in the whole world! And when I say this, I mean it because I am not much a sweet tooth and don’t even like sweet thing. However, for these puffy, pillowy, fluffy fried dough-balls with outer layer deep-fried to golden crisp and glory, I simply couldn’t resist…

So, every morning, we got ourselves some hot-off-the-fryer malasadas (malassadas), made a pot of coffee, sat out in the balcony soaking up the balmy weather of Oahu, looking out to the simmering blue sea fringing the legendary Waikiki Beach. Sometimes, life is just sweeeeeet and beautiful!

1926 S Beretania Street
Honolulu, Oahu

Champion’s malasadas is our favorite. At 60 cents each, their plain malasada has perfect textures: eggy, ultra-light and chewy at the same time. Sinking my teeth into their freshly-made malasadas is pure heaven.

Leonard’s Bakery
933 Kapahulu Ave
Honolulu, Oahu

Leonard’s Bakery is hard to miss with its iconic neon sign erected on Kapahulu Ave. Leonard’s malasadas are good, but the texture is a little soft and less chewy. Their custard malasadas are better compared to Champion’s, and they also offer cinnamon sugar coating in addition to plain sugar. If you like varieties, then Leonard’s is your answer.

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26 COMMENTS... read them below or add one

  1. patti

    Glad you got to taste the delectable malasada. Champion Bakery’s is my absolute favorite, too — perhaps because it’s so convenient to where I live. They fry it to order, so sometimes you have to wait a few minutes; but, it’s well worth it! It’s so yummy, but so not good for you. Then again, you can’t eat just one.

  2. Apicio

    Coddled egg is called malasado (undercooked) in the Philippines, obviously derived from Spanish. These filled doughnuts look like coddled eggs in that the soft center filling kind of oozes out as you take a bite. They have exactly the same treat in Brazil filled with runny dulce de leche.

  3. I think I can find a recipe, but I have not tested it. I will translate and then send it to you. It would be a way of thanking for sucj a good blog. By the way, the portuguese name means literally “no roasted enough”. I wonder why ?

  4. Vitor

    well their portuguese alright XD the thing is that ours look less perfect, their quite easy to do.. we called them Filhoses or Malaçadas like Joao said, although this last name isnt much used.. there is also a smaller version of them called sonhos, i just love them, normally its eaten at christmas time. well their good fresh but try and put some extra sugar on them and leave them in the fridge 1 day or so.. they become even better!! with liquiry sugar, hmmm tasty!

  5. Michael

    Glad you got to try malasadas in Hawaii. Just seeing your Hawaii posts now and should’ve shared some of my personal Hawaii favorites with you :)

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